FDA Approves Galliprant, a New Animal Drug for Osteoarthritis in Dogs

FDA Approves Galliprant, a New Animal Drug for Osteoarthritis in Dogs

March 21, 2016
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today announced the approval of Galliprant (grapiprant tablets), a new animal drug intended to control pain and inflammation associated with osteoarthritis in dogs.

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a condition where cartilage – the protective material that cushions a joint – . . . → Read More: FDA Approves Galliprant, a New Animal Drug for Osteoarthritis in Dogs

Dr. Nicola Mason Bone Cancer Vaccine update

It is now over 16 months since the first dog diagnosed with spontaneous osteosarcoma received an experimental bone cancer vaccine at the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Veterinary Medicine. The vaccine is being administered to pet dogs that have been diagnosed with osteosarcoma, an aggressive tumor that affects the long bones of large and giant breed dogs.

With current standard of care, that consists of amputation and follow up chemotherapy, median survival times are between 200 and 300 days. The aim of the vaccine, given to dogs after amputation and chemotherapy, is to prevent metastatic disease and prolong overall survival. Of the first 5 dogs vaccinated in this clinical trial, 4 of the dogs are still alive and have survived between 500 and 590 days; three of these dogs are tumor free. Other dogs have been vaccinated more recently so long term survival data for these dogs is not yet available. Continue reading Dr. Nicola Mason Bone Cancer Vaccine update

Stem cell banking for dogs

Cultured stem cells from your dog can be used for arthritis or cancer treatment in the future. Other diseases are being researched for this treatment.

How to get stem cells from your dog and then bank them:
The StemInsure service provides banked stem cells that can be grown to supply a lifetime of stem cell therapy for dogs.

The process is
Collect only 5 grams of fat (about the size of a grape).
Collect fat at spay, neuter, or any procedure where your vet uses anesthesia.
Vet-Stem processes and banks stem cells for future culturing (growing) and use.

Affordability
Reasonable up front processing cost (see your veterinarian for specific pricing).
Only $50 per year banking (storage) fee for the StemInsure sample after the first year.
Costs are spread out over time.
Avoid a separate surgical fat collection in the future.
Provide treatment options for current applications as well as future applications of stem cells.
One fat collection per patient can provide a lifetime of stem cell therapy.

Important Facts for Dog Owners: Continue reading Stem cell banking for dogs

IBD & Legg-Calve Perthes Disease study

Medical News Today
Research Into IBD, LCPD In Westies May Contribute To Human Disease Research
19 Jul 2011

The Westie Foundation of America (WFA) has announced preliminary findings in two major studies involving the health of West Highland White Terriers also known as Westies. Findings in these and other studies of Westies and other dogs may hold answers for similar human conditions like Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). The studies are jointly funded by the WFA and the AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF).
Continue reading IBD & Legg-Calve Perthes Disease study

Predictors of Hip Dysplasia

Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2011 Jan 4. [Epub ahead of print]
Canine Hip Dysplasia is Predictable by Genotyping.
Guo G, Zhou Z, Wang Y, Zhao K, Zhu L, Lust G, Hunter L, Friedenberg S, Li J, Zhang Y, Harris S, Jones P, Sandler J, Krotscheck U, Todhunter R, Zhang Z.
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To establish a predictive method using whole nome
genotyping for early intervention in canine hip dysplasia (CHD) risk
management, for the prevention of the progression of secondary
osteoarthritis (OA), and for selective breeding. Continue reading Predictors of Hip Dysplasia

Femoral Head Ostectomy (FHO)

See also : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Femoral_head_ostectomy

Comparison of Total Hip Replacement (THR) to Femoral Head Ostectomy (FHO)
from: http://www.gcvs.com/

Total Hip Replacement surgery is performed to improve a dog’s quality of life suffering from hip pain by providing a pain-free joint with normal biomechanical function. Regardless of the problem causing the hip pain, treatment options range from conservative medical management to surgical treatment. Common options offered include total hip replacement (THR) or a femoral head ostectomy (FHO). Continue reading Femoral Head Ostectomy (FHO)

JPS for hip dysplasia clinical results 2010

Canine hip dysplasia treated by juvenile pubic symphysiodesis. Part II: two year clinical results. Dueland RT, Patricelli AJ, Adams WM, Linn KA, Crump PM.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To determine the clinical effects of juvenile pubic symphysiodesis (JPS) treatment in hip dysplasia-prone puppies with comparison to similar untreated control puppies. Continue reading JPS for hip dysplasia clinical results 2010