Stem cell banking for dogs

Cultured stem cells from your dog can be used for arthritis or cancer treatment in the future. Other diseases are being researched for this treatment.

How to get stem cells from your dog and then bank them:
The StemInsure service provides banked stem cells that can be grown to supply a lifetime of stem cell therapy for dogs.

The process is
Collect only 5 grams of fat (about the size of a grape).
Collect fat at spay, neuter, or any procedure where your vet uses anesthesia.
Vet-Stem processes and banks stem cells for future culturing (growing) and use.

Reasonable up front processing cost (see your veterinarian for specific pricing).
Only $50 per year banking (storage) fee for the StemInsure sample after the first year.
Costs are spread out over time.
Avoid a separate surgical fat collection in the future.
Provide treatment options for current applications as well as future applications of stem cells.
One fat collection per patient can provide a lifetime of stem cell therapy.

Important Facts for Dog Owners: Continue reading Stem cell banking for dogs

Penn Researchers : Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma Vaccine

October 18, 2011
PHILADELPHIA — An experimental vaccine developed by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania’s schools of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine is the first veterinary cancer vaccine of its kind that shows an increase in survival time for dogs with spontaneous non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. The work shows for the first time the feasibility and therapeutic efficacy of this alternative cell-based vaccine, which could be employed in the treatment of a number of different cancer types.
The research was conducted by Nicola Mason, assistant professor of medicine at Penn Vet; Robert H. Vonderheide, associate professor of hematology and oncology at the Perelman School of Medicine; and Karin U. Sorenmo, associate professor of oncology at Penn Vet. Erika Krick, Beth Overley and Thomas P. Gregor of Penn Vet and Christina M. Coughlin of the School of Medicine also contributed to the research.
Their work was published in the open access journal PLOS ONE. Continue reading Penn Researchers : Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma Vaccine

Bone Marrow Transplant in Dog

Veterinary Specialty Hospital Success With Its First Bone Marrow Transplant In Dog With Lymphoma

Veterinary Specialty Hospital of San Diego (VSH) has successfully performed a hematopoietic cell transplant (better known as bone marrow transplant) for a dog with lymphoma. Cody, an otherwise active and healthy 7-year old male Golden Retriever completed his treatment and is thriving with no complications 4 months after his discharge from the hospital. Continue reading Bone Marrow Transplant in Dog

Cancer Treatment Update

Dr. Rowan Milner, BVSc, MedVet
University of Florida

Veterinary oncology is undergoing fundamental change. The old paradigm of if it can’t be surgically removed then euthanasia is the next step no longer applies. The reason for this change is due to the following factors: pet owners are becoming more sophisticated in their requirements for specialized treatment, improved results due to better treatment protocols and drugs, a heightened awareness in private practitioner of the early signs of neoplasia leads to earlier detection of cancer leading to more successful treatment, and an increase in age of the pet population has lead to a population of pets with a greater risk of developing cancer. Continue reading Cancer Treatment Update

Bone Cancer & Neutering

Read the full text of the article or the Abstract and Excerpts below:


Although experimental and clinical evidence suggest that endogenous sex hormones influence bone sarcoma genesis, the hypothesis has not been adequately tested in an appropriate animal model. We conducted a historical cohort study of Rottweiler dogs because they frequently undergo elective gonadectomy and spontaneously develop appendicular bone sarcomas, which mimic the biological behavior of the osteosarcomas that affect children and adolescents. Continue reading Bone Cancer & Neutering

FDA approves mast cell tumor therapy
Pfizer Animal Health today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the first canine cancer therapy in the U.S. – PALLADIATM (toceranib phosphate) – which was developed by Pfizer to treat mast cell tumors in dogs. Pfizer made the announcement to veterinarians attending the 2009 American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM) Forum and Canadian Veterinary Medical Association Convention. Continue reading FDA approves mast cell tumor therapy

Diet,cancer, spaying

Canine and human breast cancer share several important clinical and histologic features. A case-control study of nutritional factors and canine breast cancer was conducted at the Veterinary Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in 1984-1987 by interviewing owners of 150 pet dogs diagnosed with breast cancer, owners of 147 cancer control dogs, and owners of 131 noncancer control dogs. Continue reading Diet,cancer, spaying