Normal vital signs

Normal Canine Vital Signs

Temperature*
Heart Rate
Respiration Rate

99.5 – 102.5 deg. F [37.5 – 39.2 deg. C]
Small breeds tend to have higher normal temperatures than large breeds.
Adult/Lg.Breed: 80- 120 beats per minute
Puppies: 120 – 140 beats per minute
15 – 30 breaths per minute

*Note: Temperatures will normally fluctuate over the course of the day. The following may . . . → Read More: Normal vital signs

Normal Lab Values: dog and cat

Normal lab values for CBC and CMP (complete metabolic panel) for dogs and cats. Presented in table form.

component
canine
feline
units

glucose
65-120
70-120
mg/dl

BUN
6-24
17-30
mg/dl

creatinine
0.4-1.4
o.6-1.6
mg/dl

tot protein
5.2-7.2
5.3-7.2
g/dl

albumin
2.5-4.3
2.6-3.9
g/dl

calcium
9.5-12
9.4-11.2
mg/dl

phosphorus
3.3-6.8
4.0-7.0
mg/dl

alk.phos.
20-200
20-220
u/l

ggt
1.2
0-10
u/l

ast
10-40
8-35
u/d

ldh
30-190
35-280
u/l

cholesterol
110-314
90-150
mg/dl

total bili
.04-.40
.08-.30
mg/dl

alt
10-70
10-130
u/l

amylase
200-1290
n/a
u/l

cpk
20-200
20-160
u/l

co2
17-24
17-24
mEq/l

triglycerides
20-200
20-100
mg/dl

direct bili
0-0.3
0-0.3
mg/dl

uric acid
0-2.0
0-1.0
mg/dl

sodium
140-151
143-153
mEq/l

potassium
3.4-5.4
3.5-5.2
mEq/l

chloride
105-120
108-128
mEq/l

lipase
120-258
120-258
u/l

globulins
0.9-4.0
1.5-4.0
g/dl

A/G
0.53-3.5
0.56-2.6

AGAP
5-30
5-30

Hgb
120-180
80-150
g/l

hct
0.37-0.55
0.24-0.45
l/l

rbc
5.5-8.5
5-10
x 10 6 /ul

mcv
60-77
39-55
fl

mch
19.5-24.5
13-17
pg

mchc
32-36
30-36
g/dl

retic
0-1.5%
0-1%
%

wbc
6-17.1
5.5-19.5
x 1000 ul

segs
3.6-11.5
2.5-12.5
x 1000/ul

bands
0-0.3
0-0.3
x1000/

eos
0.01-1.25
0.0-1.5
x 1000/ul

lympho
1.0-4.8
1.5-7.0
x1000ul

monos
0.15-1.35
0.0-0.85
x1000 . . . → Read More: Normal Lab Values: dog and cat

Lab Results : what they mean

What the results of a CBC, Chemistry Profile (CMP), and a Urinalysis mean…

A wide variety of tests are used to certify good health or indicate the presence of infection or disease. The major tests and some of the common vocabulary in lab reports are explained below.

A Complete Blood Count indicates . . . → Read More: Lab Results : what they mean

Analgesics Position Statement

The American Animal Hospital Association recommends that veterinarians routinely administer appropriate analgesics to minimize pain in their patients.

Analgesics need to be used preemptively for any medical condition or veterinary procedure associated with pain and for as long as necessary to prevent pain during recovery. AAHA agrees with The American College of Veterinary Anesthesiologists that if a . . . → Read More: Analgesics Position Statement

Canine Devocalization Position Statement

The American Animal Hospital Association is opposed to the practice known as debarking, canine devocalization or vocal cordectomy.

Devocalization for inappropriate and excessive vocalization is often ineffective in achieving the desired results and can deprive canines of the ability to perform a normal behavior. Appropriate behavioral modification efforts should be employed that avoid the use of punishment . . . → Read More: Canine Devocalization Position Statement

Canine influenza case in San Diego county

Dog Flu Reported in San Diego County
Canine influenza was first reported in Florida in 2004 and has spread across the United States

Source: Dog Flu Reported in San Diego County | NBC 7 San Diego
A dog has tested positive for canine influenza in what’s believed to be the first documented case in San Diego County.

Dawn Danielson, director of the San Diego County Department of Animal Services, confirmed the positive test result Friday from a dog at the county’s shelter in Bonita.

While this isn’t the first case in California, it is the first reported case in the county according to the department.

Dogs that are infected will show symptoms including a cough, runny nose and fever. Experts at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say a small proportion of dogs can develop severe disease.

The virus does not spread to humans however it can spread from dog to dog through a human’s touch. Continue reading Canine influenza case in San Diego county

Temperature in closed car

HEAT EXPOSURE IN AN ENCLOSED AUTOMOBILE

LYNN I. GIBBS, MPH; DAVID W. LAWRENCE, MPH, RN,CS; MEL A. KOHN, MD

ABSTRACT

During July 1995, an infant in southeast Louisiana died as a result of heat exposure in an enclosed automobile. To evaluate degree of heat exposure in a vehicle, we compared the temperature rise inside an enclosed, dark-colored vehicle with the temperature rise in a light-colored vehicle with the windows partly open. Within 20 minutes, readings in both cars exceeded 125°F and reached approximately 140°F in 40 minutes–a temperature rise of over 45°F. A person who is unable to remove himself from an enclosed vehicle is at risk for a life-threatening crisis if left alone in a sun-exposed car for even a relatively short period of time.

INTRODUCTION

When the body is exposed to extreme temperatures serious harm can occur. Although heat-related illness and death occur primarily among the elderly, infants are also at risk (1, 2) Heat exhaustion and heat stroke can occur rapidly in enclosed vehicles. During July 1995, a two-year-old child in southeast Louisiana died as a result of heat exposure in an enclosed automobile. In addition, two children under the age of five died in Louisiana during 1993 from heat exposure.

This study compares the temperature rise inside two vehicles exposed to sunlight.

Continue reading Temperature in closed car