How hot is a parked car?

Check out this vet’s measurement of a car with windows cracked open 2 inches in the shade.  Why heatstroke is a . . . → Read More: How hot is a parked car?

Temperature in closed car

HEAT EXPOSURE IN AN ENCLOSED AUTOMOBILE

LYNN I. GIBBS, MPH; DAVID W. LAWRENCE, MPH, RN,CS; MEL A. KOHN, MD

ABSTRACT

During July 1995, an infant in southeast Louisiana died as a result of heat exposure in an enclosed automobile. To evaluate degree of heat exposure in a vehicle, we compared the temperature rise inside an enclosed, dark-colored vehicle with the temperature rise in a light-colored vehicle with the windows partly open. Within 20 minutes, readings in both cars exceeded 125°F and reached approximately 140°F in 40 minutes–a temperature rise of over 45°F. A person who is unable to remove himself from an enclosed vehicle is at risk for a life-threatening crisis if left alone in a sun-exposed car for even a relatively short period of time.

INTRODUCTION

When the body is exposed to extreme temperatures serious harm can occur. Although heat-related illness and death occur primarily among the elderly, infants are also at risk (1, 2) Heat exhaustion and heat stroke can occur rapidly in enclosed vehicles. During July 1995, a two-year-old child in southeast Louisiana died as a result of heat exposure in an enclosed automobile. In addition, two children under the age of five died in Louisiana during 1993 from heat exposure.

This study compares the temperature rise inside two vehicles exposed to sunlight.

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Heatstroke

Time to look at Dr Nate Baxter’s guidelines for preventing treating heatstroke.

If you haven’t already downloaded this to keep in your car and home, now is . . . → Read More: Heatstroke

Heatstroke

Heat Stroke and Overheating in Dogs: Treatment & Prevention.

Nate Baxter, DVM

Guideline and overview for dogs that overheat.
PDF file to download and keep in car : avoiding_heat_related_injuries_in_dogs.pdf.

The first thing that needs to be understood is that dogs and people are different enough that most of the info cannot cross lines. I do not profess to know what . . . → Read More: Heatstroke